Improperly secured equipment blamed for NYC subway crash

If you work in New York City, you may be among the crowds of commuters who use the subway. If so, you are probably accustomed to delays and even the occasional accident.

One of those accidents occurred in the summer of 2017, resulting in injuries to dozens of passengers.

A little background

The subway system in New York City has been in operation for decades and is the major source of daily transportation for millions of people. However, the subway is not maintained well, and the trains are not always operated as they should be. Many passengers complain about frequent delays that sometimes shut the subway down for hours.

What happened

A subway train derailed between the 125 Street and 135 Street stations. Repairs to the line were underway, and the derailment was caused by a piece of replacement rail that was said to be “improperly secured.” The subway train smashed into a wall, and the impact was such that it tore a metal door off one of the cars. According to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, equipment used in repair projects is often stored in between the tracks, but in this case, the rail that caused the crash had not been bolted down properly.

How passengers fared

The passengers shared their experiences and accompanying photos on social media. One rider said that the train “suddenly jerked and began shaking violently.” Following the crash, MTA personnel helped passengers out of the subway cars, which had filled up with smoke, and led them through a darkened tunnel to the station platform. Many used the lights from their cellphones to find their way. In all, 34 people were injured and taken to local hospitals.

Who is to blame

Personal injury cases associated with mass transportation are complex because blame for an accident could be spread among many parties. For example, depending on the circumstances, these could include the entity that owns and operates the subway trains, those involved with maintaining safety procedures and even individuals, such as members of the train crew. In any event, when passengers are injured in a subway accident, the responsible parties must be held accountable.

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